Review: What’s New / DDCdances / April 11 / Smith Theatre Farmington Hills

By Paulette Brockington

3 + 2 = DDC New Dances

DDCdances (Detroit Dance Collective), a stalwart in the metropolitan dance scene, begins its 35th year with an eye to community, relationships and an honest sense of being.

The April 11, 2014 concert at the Wallace Smith Theatre began and ended with premieres. “Gather Round,” choreographed by Corinne Imberski, provided a soothing sense of community. This rondo was a pleasant opener offering rich, folk sounds from Bela Bartok and clean lines reminiscent of Doris Humphrey’s ”Air on a G String.”  The movement’s recapitulation at the end offered the satisfaction of friendship.

HNM Dance joined DDCdances performing two works on the concert. “Miserere,” choreographed by David Earle, harkened back to the tableau. Tableau vivant, a term borrowed from the French language, means living picture. In “Miserere” the dancers move from scene to scene interacting in unison and canon making moments in time sculptures / living artwork. In this instance the dancers technique is not important. 19th century tableaux cleverly bypassed laws on public nudity by using still bodies to recreate classical sculptures. In “Miserere” the dancers are clothed but somehow feel bare to the audience. The work also made me feel that I was watching a community of cave dwellers living their lives, discovering, and sacrificing.

Sue Clayton and Amy Hutchinson in 'The Room'. Photo (c) John Sobczak

Sue Clayton and Amy Hutchinson in ‘The Room’. Photo (c) John Sobczak

An excerpt from “The Room,” was next in the line-up for DDCdances. Choreographed by Barbara Selinger in 2011, “The Room” looked at relationships before a barrier of a brick wall. When the wall opened and the quartet dealt with the solitary movements of each and the interaction of all. A foot on a chair, a shoulder to a knee helped portray their relationships.

HNM Dance performed “Bolero” before intermission. The music plugged into Gregorian chant, ethereal Celtic music, layered vocals drawing on aspects of global dance rhythms culminating in a mash up of Karl Jenkins voices and strains, Ravel’s “Bolero” and music by The Kinks. The movement’s thematic material was artfully manipulated through repetition. A large group, HNM Dance moved with emotion through the space affording solos and duos their space in which to shine, a compliment to Anh Nguyen, its choreographer and artistic director.

Amy Hutchinson, David Guzman and Elizabeth Schultz in 'Indivisible'. Photo (c) John Sobczak

Amy Hutchinson, David Guzman and Elizabeth Schultz in ‘Indivisible’. Photo (c) John Sobczak

DDCdances concluded the concert with the premiere of “Indivisible.” This work, choreographed by Barbara Selinger with Selinger’s videography and Bernadine Vida’s photography, explored images of the Heidelberg Project through movement, stillness and splashes of color. The Heidelberg Project is art, energy, and community. It’s an open-air art environment in the heart of an urban community on Detroit’s East Side. The videography may have been overbearing at times but its mission was felt.  Its most striking moment for me was recognizing the strong sense of the plight of the homeless in a riot of color evoking the memory of smells, frustration and just being. Because of that I’d say the “Indivisible” did just as the Project does. It used its lines, shapes, voices and stillness to provoke thought and discussion, inspire action and provide a sense of community. You can’t heal a community without the chord that seemed to run through each piece on the concert.

David Guzman in 'Indivisible'. Photo (c) John Sobczak

David Guzman in ‘Indivisible’. Photo (c) John Sobczak

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